Anthology: Mirrors & Thorns

Mirror & Thorns –
Twisted Fairy Tale Anthology.

Published by Catterfly Publishing, an OWS Ink LLC subsidiary

 

Where the fairytale ends, and the reflection begins

 

OWS Ink, LLC is very excited to announce the publication of our 2017 anthology, Mirror & Thorns. Just in time for Halloween, these fourteen stories from fourteen different authors will have you curled up on the couch ignoring those trick or treaters! These exceptional tales will stay with you long after the last page. This collection of short stories releases on Wednesday, October, 25th, 2017, and a Facebook Release Party open to the public occurs on  October 21, 2017. (https://goo.gl/ujYHPv).

 

The authors have weaved each one of these enchanting stories with quirky and intriguing characters as well as plots with compelling twists. You can learn more about these authors and the anthology by following along with the book blog tour which begins on ourwriteside.com on October 20th.  Preorders will begin at the Facebook event on the 21st.

A dark fairy tale collection from the twisted pens of:

J.M. Ames, Kerry E.B. Black, J.K. Allen, C.L. Bledsoe, Lucy Palmer, Stacy Overby, T.S. Dickerson, Edward Ahern, Melanie Noell Bernard, S.L. Scott, Sarah Nour, Paul Stansbury, Cassidy Taylor, and J. Lee Strickland.  

 

Guest post for Cassidy Taylor

I have a piece of paper taped up beside my desk that says: “A professional writer is an amateur who didn’t quit.” (Credit: Richard Bach). I look at it every day. In the morning, when I’m getting ready for work before the sun is even up. In the evening, when I finally take my shoes off before making dinner and helping with homework. When I’m changing into my pajamas and looking longingly at my bed.

I’m a mom. I have a commute and a full-time job. The only time I have to write is late at night when everyone else is asleep and I should be, too. Sometimes, the thought of getting up in the morning is so brutally exhausting that I truly consider just throwing in the towel.

But I won’t quit.

I consider myself one of those people who has always been a writer. One of my earliest memories is flipping through a Peter Pan picture book and making up my own stories to go with the illustrations since I couldn’t read yet. I attended young writers’ conferences as a child, and still have a copy of a poem I wrote about writer’s block that won me a place in one of those conferences, but I won’t show it to you so don’t ask.

Then I went to college. My university had an intense and competitive creative writing track, and I hopped on it, cruising through the beginner and intermediate courses with amazing teachers (*ahem* Sarah Dessen *ahem*) and making it into the advanced workshop.

This was the class of my nightmares. We met outside (strike one) and had to actually critique each other in person (strike two for introverted me). The other students were brooding and had colorful hair and wrote deep metaphorical stories. I wrote *gasp* genre fiction. I didn’t know that term then, but everything I wrote had a young voice and fantastical elements. The professor, an author with wild, white-gray hair reminiscent of Doc Brown, hated it. He hated everything I wrote. Instead of quitting, which I so desperately wanted to do, I paid attention, because that’s what writers do. I learned what he liked and what the class responded to.

For my final assignment, I wrote dark, weird “literary” fiction featuring sex and adultery, and do you know what? He brought me a bag of candy and awarded it to me as the Most Improved. Strike three. That was the moment I knew he would never advance me to the Senior Workshop.

It was the best thing that could have happened to me. Because after I drowned my sorrows in that bag of candy, and I flipped to the page in the catalog with other classes that I could take to complete my degree, there was a children’s literature track. Under the wise and watchful eye of local author and professor Ruth Moose, I realized that this was what I was meant to do all along. I didn’t quit. Instead, I found my niche, and won the Bill Hooks Award for Young Adult Fiction when I graduated in 2007.

It’s been ten years. I’ve had two jobs. Gotten married. Had two children who are growing like weeds and discovering the magic of reading for themselves. Two of my stories have been published in anthologies, and my debut novel will be published by the end of the year. And still, every night, I sit down in my chair and write. Because I don’t have a choice. I am a writer. And I will not quit.  

 

Author’s bio:

Cassidy Taylor is a fantasy author who studied English and Creative Writing at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It was there that she found her niche in children’s literature, and won the Bill Hooks Award for Young Adult Fiction in 2007. Her first novel, When Rains Fall, is forthcoming in 2017.
She lives in beautiful North Carolina with her husband, two kids, two dogs, and one cat who thinks he’s a dog.

 

To learn more about this new anthology visit Our Write Side (http://ourwriteside.com).

 

 

 

 

To arrange an author interview, review copies, photos, or for additional information please contact Amanda Mabry, Executive Marketing Director OWS Ink almabry@ourwriteside.com

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2 Replies to “Anthology: Mirrors & Thorns”

    1. BewareOfTheReader says: Reply

      Thanks 😉

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